March 12–15. Who´s Afraid

March 12 at 7pm
March 13 at 7pm
March 14 at 7pm
March 15 at 4pm

Weld
Norrtullsgatan 7

Book: book.weld.se

Who’s Afraid is a series of dances that contains and evokes the affects and imaginaries structured by colours as emotional, spiritual and physical matter. It opens to the potential of colour to propose particular kinds of moving that allows us to attend to the feminine, the vulgar, the infantile, the queer, the secondary… the historically marginalized or immaterial structures of feeling, body, senses, and environment that haunts our context, our embodiment and our dancing.

Who’s Afraid rests on questions about the impact of colours on us as humans and our experience of the outside world. Colour is one of the first things we can differentiates before we can conceptualize identity or a symbolic order. At the same time, it serves as an organizational principle, shapes social concepts and understandings of the world. Take for example the rich variety of experiences, cultural references and prejudices that hide in a colour like blue.

Dance and choreography by Ulrika Berg, Louise Dahl & Hana Lee Erdman
Set/light design by Jens Sethzman


With support from: Swedish Arts Council, the Swedish Arts Grants Committee and Stockholms Stad
Co-production: Weld and Kulturcentrum i Sandviken
Co-production through studio residency: MDT and HALLEN in Farsta

Weld is supported by Stockholms stad, the Swedish Arts Council and Region Stockholm


Ulrika Berg (SE)
is a Stockholm based dance artist and educator of dance. In her work she takes an interest in developing conditions, frameworks and generative sources for dancing, through activation of different relations between perception, movement, sensation and imagination. As a dancer she works in close collaborations with other artists as well as initiating own works. She has worked together with, among others, Deborah Hay, Cristina Caprioli, Rebecka Stillman, Janne-Camilla Lyster, Ludvig Daae, and with the Cullberg in works of Ezster Salamon (Reproduction 2015) and Deborah Hay (Figure a Sea). She holds a Master’s degree in New Performative Practices. Since 2015 she is an assistant professor of Dance at SKH Dance (Stockholm University of the Arts).

Hana Lee Erdman (DE/SE)
is a dance artist living between Stockholm and Berlin. She works with choreography and curatorial practices, approaching performance from embodied and relational sensibilities. Her artistic work generates a space of public intimacy and sensitivity, proposing the practice of being together as a creative one. She wants to see what and how we can do together in order to create potential for transformative experiences through subtle and subversive shifts of power and exchange. She has been working with artists like Cristina Caprioli, Mårten Spångberg, Keith Hennessy, Isabelle Schad, Jassem Hindi, and Sara Shelton Mann. She has a Masters Degree in Dance/Authorship from the University of Art Berlin, (HZT).

Louise Dahl (SE)
is working within the field of dance and choreography with Stockholm as her base. She works as a dancer in collaboration with other artists as well as authoring her own creations. She is interested in developing new forms of subjective and kinesthetic experience that convey the transformative potential of the body. Louise has been working with artist like Margrét Sara Gudjónsdóttir, Cristina Caprioli, Mårten Spångberg, Frédéric Gies, Philip Berlin, Mirko Guido and Mette Ingvartsen. She completed her studies at DOCH, in the context of the BA program Contemporary Dance and Performance.

Jens Sethzman (SE)
started to create his own artistic work in the beginning of the 90´s with a focus on light and painting as primary sources and has since been working with contemporary choreography as his main field. His development as an artist has been influenced by the possibilities of the modern technology of light and its architecture. His work is characterized by precise aesthetic spaces where you experience light as a medium in itself and its irrationality, musicality and mathematics. The defined output of these spaces are works of art that can stand for itself but vanishes as soon as they’re executed, very much like the movements they envelope.